Pulling wires…not fun, but has to be done.

Working on the electrical and plumbing systems is not much fun and takes time. You could not see progress of your work until you hookup the batteries, and that will happen not soon yet. For such small area it seems like a lot of wires. We pulled 250 feet of the electrical wire and had to order some more. It seems our bus will be very bright inside! We will have lights more than Christmas trees…porch light, entry light, stair light, whatever light, we got it all!

“Bed time” for the “Drill Team”…

It’s time to build first piece of the furniture for our bus. It’s a “bed time”! I never suspected that building your own bed would be so much fun. Luckily, Kevin is very much more experienced in advance carpentry than me. In no time at all, our “Drill Team”, Kevin and me, created this wonderful piece of furniture! It’s a Queen, foldable in the middle, and could be used as a bed futon sofa.

“Drill Team” at work. Building the bed.

Happy First month anniversary working on Lucky 8!

The first month of converting our shorty school bus past by very fast. Every day around 8 am, including weekends, we diligently driving to work on our project. On the way to work we stop either at the Home Depot, or Loves, or our local neighboring construction store. We missed only two days of work on the bus! What did we accomplish in the first month? We gutted it, installed trucks for solar panels, fixed the subfloor, skinned the windows, rubber seal painted, electrical – removed excess wires, rerouted exhaust, found the air tank problem, made under carriage mounts for tanks and propane, fixed the engine squeak, patched holes in the ceiling, framed ceiling and walls, and put floor insulation.

A bit tired, but happy to work on our bus!

Lucky8 is getting ceiling framing, finally…

It’s almost a month we are working on our new home. Finally, we are getting to the fun work – framing inside of the bus.  It’s much cleaner and fun working with the plywood and 2×2. Drills, chop saw, hand saw, and wonderful smell of the freshly cut wood.

Idle pulley failed

6302lua idle pulley

We had the engine running fixing a different issue and noticed an odd clicking noise.

The first approach was to spray water on each pulley and see if the noise stopped for a bit and then returned. This narrowed down the search, bit was difficult to isolate the exact pulley.

The next step was to remove the belt and spin the pulleys and see which one made an odd noise. The belt is easily removed with a 1/2″ breaker bar and pulling the tensioner over to release the tension.

With the belt removed the pulley spinning revealed the idle pulley was squeaking. A 14mm took the pulley off and revealed the bearing was missing some balls.

Tried to find the pulley, but that was unsuccessful, so a little cleaning revealed the bearing model, 6203lua. With this information I was able to buy two replacements bearings at NAPA for $5.00 each.

Remove the retaining click, beat out the bearings using a large socket. Pound the new ones in using the old ones to beat on. Clip the retaining clip in and mount on engine.

Viola, that noise is gone. Now on to the next noise.

Grinding and more grinding


That grinder is earning it’s keep on this bus. Actually we have 3 of them. They are the go to tool lately for this part of the project.

We have removed a lot of stripped screws, pop rivets and extra pieces that we don’t think we need.

Not sure how many blades we have been through, but it’s a lot. And a lot of sanding pads.

Today was a few stuck screws and a few hidden pop rivets. This allowed us to remove the back wall and expose more wires that were not needed and hence removed.

Day 18?

Priming the sheet metal

After 2 days off from bus work we are back at it again. The last 2 days we were taking care of our other yacht. Had to do some cleaning and a sea trial. That was a riot.

Today Marina primed the sheet metal that am arrived a week late. We had 5 sheets of sheet metal cut for the skins for the windows by Z metals. The pieces were delivered today and Marina spent the day spray priming them

While she was doing that, I patched the two exit holes in the roof. I used galvanized 16 gauge sheet metal for those two patches and about 60 button head screws. The seams were sealed with a black gooey substance that was served in a caulk tube. I would like to see the person that can pump that stuff through a caulk gun. It’s Thicker than peanut butter and stickier. So I cut the tube open and applied it with a 5 in 1.

That took the better part of the day. The morning was blessed with the neighbor, the old neighbor and the sheet metal delivery guy asking lots of questions and generally just chit chatting. Lots of people with nothing to do. Ok, back to work

Priming the skins

Exhaust System Rerouted

Exhaust out the side

So in order to free up some precious space underneath the bus we needed to reroute the exhaust pipe. It originally ran from the front of the bus all the way to the very back. This 4″ exhaust pipe occupied a lot of space and nothing could be close to it because of the heat.

So, we removed the pieces of exhaust that were pieced together from the bank of the bus up and over the rear axel stopping 2 feet before the muffler. Now all we needed was an elbow which we got from NAPA to make the turn out the passenger’s side. The next step was to cut off about a foot of the exhaust pipe still remaining and then place the elbow on that shortened exhaust pipe. With the elbow in place we were able to use a piece of the tail pipe we removed to attach to the elbow and run it out between the fuel tank and the rear tire.

The only part you really see is the cool cheap stainless steel exhaust tip.